Other languages with Google Translate

Use Google to automatically translate this website. We take no responsibility for the accuracy of the translation.

Prata med oss

How to make complaints

The Church of Sweden's International work is based on fundamental values upholding the equal worth and rights of all people, and the vision of a dignified life for everyone. On this page you can learn about how to complain if the Church of Sweden’s International work does not meet our commitments.

The Church of Sweden International work believes in delivering a high quality of work and results. When we do not meet our commitments, all of Church of Sweden’s International work stakeholders are entitled to give feedback and complain. In this way, we can improve the results of our work while reducing the risk of inefficiency, abuse or unlawful appropriation of the resources we manage.

submit a complaint

By submitting a complaint you agree to Church of Sweden's Guidelines for handling complaints. These Guidelines clarify who can complain, what type of complaints can be made, how to complain, the procedure for handling complaints and investigations, disciplinary action and follow-up and learning. Submit a complaint. 

It is the intention of the Church of Sweden International work to handle complaints in a fair, appropriate and prompt manner. All complaints that are received are securely and confidentially processed following to the Guidelines for complaints handling.  

What complaints can be made?

The Church of Sweden International work handles complaints concerning shortcomings in compliance with the commitments defined in the Church of Sweden’s International work Quality and accountability framework and the Church of Sweden Codes of conduct, including:

  • Implementation of projects that the Church of Sweden performs itself or with a partner that do not live up to applicable standards, principles and guidelines. 
  • Perceived shortcomings in the Church of Sweden International work’s and/or partner’s handling of commitments in agreements.
  • Perceived lack of respect for the donor and/or the donor’s wishes when handling donations.
  • Suspicion or testimony about staff and/or partner’s staff not complying with the Church of Sweden’s National level and International work Codes of conduct. This can including various types of suspected misconduct including corruption, fraud, sexual exploitation and abuse, and not ensuring the safeguarding of children.

codes of conduct

All individuals working for or representing the international department are bound by the ACT Alliance Code of Conduct for the prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse, fraud, corruption and abuse of power.

All staff are also bound by the Church of Sweden’s Church House Code of Conduct.

Church of Sweden is also bound by the ACT Code of Good Practice, an organisational level commitment which means that Church of Sweden strives for continuous improvement and movement toward best practice.   

Church of Sweden’s humanitarian relief work is conducted in accordance with the Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief:

1. The humanitarian imperative comes first. 

2. Aid is given regardless of the race, creed or nationality of the recipients and without adverse distinction of any kind. Aid priorities are calculated on the basis of need alone.

3. Aid will not be used to further a particular political or religious standpoint.

4. We shall endeavour not to act as instruments of government foreign policy.

5. We shall respect culture and custom. 

6. We shall attempt to build disaster response on local capacities. 

7. Ways shall be found to involve programme beneficiaries in the management of relief aid. 

8. Relief aid must strive to reduce future vulnerabilities to disaster as well as meeting basic needs.

9. We hold ourselves accountable to both those we seek to assist and those from whom we accept resources.

10. In our information, publicity and advertising activities, we shall recognize disaster victims as dignified human beings, not hopeless objects.